Marketing the Codex

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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby drkguy3107 » Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:06 pm

I know, I was responding to the later ones in your post. Kievan russia I don't know enough about, outremer would be fun, so would a hussite campaign (war wagons) lol.
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Galloglaich » Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:13 am

Yeah Hussites could be cool because you could have a lot of urban intrigue with the various fencing schools, like in a Samurai film. Prague was a major base of both the Marxbruder and the Federfechter.

Kievan Rus is fascinating for a wilderness campaign. Think of Last of the Mohekans in the 8th Century, with Vikings. Isolated wooden forts and trading towns linked by rowboats along a vast network of rivers cutting through deep primordial forests and steppe, with packs of man eating wolves and bears, and anyone from the Franks to the Mongols to the Byzantines ready to show up at any minute.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kievan_Rus%27

Their trading cities sounded remarkably livable by the standards of the times:

Kievan Rus', although sparsely populated compared to Western Europe [1], was not only the largest contemporary European state in terms of area but also culturally advanced.[9] Literacy in Kiev, Novgorod and other large cities was high.[10][11] As birch bark documents attest, they exchanged love letters and prepared cheat sheets for schools. Novgorod had a sewage system[12] and wood paving not often found in other cities at the time. The Russkaya Pravda confined punishments to fines and generally did not use capital punishment.[13] Certain inalienable rights were accorded to women, such as property and inheritance rights.[14][15][16]


All that changed after the Mongols came in the 1200's though.

There was also a powerful but decadent Oriental Empire, slowly losing ground to the Varangians (Vikings) and passing on their secrets in the process, since they had a common enemy among the barbarians of the Eastern Steppe. Interestingly, though of Turkish origin, they were Jewish.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khazars

G.
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Arkon » Thu Sep 09, 2010 9:24 pm

Forgotten Realms/R.A. Salvatore fan forums could be a good place to promote the Codex.
Basically, R.A. Salvatore tends to write about very skilled fighters, especially his main character - Drizzt Do'Urden. I'm pretty sure that a lot of his fans are fascinated with skills of his characters and would love to be able to play an interesting fighter character.
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby zarlor » Fri Sep 10, 2010 4:10 pm

That may be true of his fans, but Mr. Salvatore himself makes some glaringly bad mistakes about combat maneuvers in his books. I remember in particular how he talks about one particular fight between Drizzt and Zaknafein where Zak works his blades "up" with successive attacks (as if you actually had to work at that, I mean just make an attack high and they'll defend high, but there is something to be said about luring an opponent into expecting that you will make an attack from one direction and then modifying what you've gotten them to expect from you), and then he makes the, supposedly, deadly "double attack low". Where all you can do is defend against this particular maneuver with a crossed-blade double-block low, so the best you can hope for is a tie, if you will. (In Italian Fencing it would be you had to respond in Tempo but had no ability to respond Contra or Mezzo Tempo). Essentially you couldn't riposte to the attack, but Drizzt had figured out a way to do it by kicking up between his low crossed blades.

In reality the whole description is downright dumb (although I greatly enjoy the books otherwise, so don't get me wrong there). If someone is dumb enough to attack low with both weapons at the same time you're in an exceptionally good position because you can either do a simple movement to get the lower body out of the way while attacking high yourself (try it, if someone goes for your leg, move the leg back while attacking their head, that's an attack you can win against every time) or you could just use one blade to happily sweep away both of the other blades and controlling the line while having your other weapon completely free to respond with in whatever nasty way you feel like.

All of which is to say that I've yet to read much of anything in is otherwise excellent books that shows he really has much understanding at all about the dynamics of combat. But, he does try to break things down into maneuvers and the like (no matter how unrealistic) and, as such, maybe his fans would be interested in how the Codex does things. Come to that, maybe we could get the author himself interested and give him some more ideas on how to make his fight scenes like that a lot more realistic. ;)
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Arkon » Sun Sep 12, 2010 3:09 am

Yeah, it would be nice to have a known writer in the western martial arts camp.

I have to say that I can't stomach his Drizzit novels any more, bad combat or good, though - he overdoes the "they thought that x died but in fact x was alive" thing.
...
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Galloglaich » Sun Sep 12, 2010 7:24 pm

I read the first Drzzt book, it was pretty good, I always liked the Drow, but yeah the fighting was getting a bit silly from right out of the gate and as the book progressed, it was just a little too I don't know a little too Fantasy / DnD cliche for me, I had a harder time staying immersed.

When it comes to fantasy novels, I still really like some of the old ones, the original Robert E. Howard Conan stories are great (and the fighting is quite realistic... he even wears armor and runs away when he is out numbered) Jack Vance's Dying Earth is great, classic... Fritz Liebers Fafhred and Grey mouser still hold up pretty well. I'm still a complete sucker for Lovecraft of course though that isn't exactly fantasy.

For more modern stuff, Michael Sheas Jack Vance spinoff "Nifft the Lean" is pretty good, Keith Taylors "Bard" was also pretty plausible.

But all of these led me to history, which the authors of these books were so conversant in, and to get that kind of drug of fantastic adventure I still sometimes need, I've increasingly turned to historical fiction. Turks can be just as scary as Orcs, I've found, the Black Forest or Ireland or Finland or Medieval Spain can be just as mysterious and spine tingling as any Middle Earth. I think I would have liked Drzzt a whole lot when I was a teenager, I liked plenty of equivalent fantasy novels quite a bit, but the Masque of the Red Death grabbed me more than the Drzzt story, all the more because I knew it was based on a world which really existed historically.

Right now I'm reading a real good historical novel series, I usually combine these with reading a lot of actual history (primary sources and modern analysis) of the period in question. I get a lot out of it and I don't feel like I'm wasting my time.

But I'm still a sucker for a really good fantasy yarn when I can find one.

G.
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Arkon » Tue Sep 14, 2010 1:40 am

Galloglaich wrote:I read the first Drzzt book, it was pretty good, I always liked the Drow, but yeah the fighting was getting a bit silly from right out of the gate and as the book progressed, it was just a little too I don't know a little too Fantasy / DnD cliche for me, I had a harder time staying immersed.

The worst thing that he even managed to get the character sidetracked in later books.
While in the first book, he was a stoic old martial arts master type, in next books of the trilogy, Drizzt got a bit more angsty. Then in a second trilogy, R.A. Salvatore retconned his backstory to make him more angsty in further novels, probably so that the books would sell better to teenagers.
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Galloglaich » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:32 pm

Have you found any other fantasy genre books that you like these days? i don't really know what is out there any more.

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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby Arkon » Thu Sep 16, 2010 1:12 am

Well, I'm mostly into Sci-Fi nowadays.
I started reading Iliad some time ago, but I got some other very interesting books and I have left it for later.

Last fantasy novel that I've finished reading was one of C.L.Werner's Warhammer novels - Place of the Plague. It pretty enjoyable, mostly because he writes about northern tribes that live in the shadow of Chaos.
I've found their perspective pretty interesting, especially that the books usually include some completely insane places in the chaos wastes.

The best stuff that I've read so far was The Witcher and Hussite Trilogy by Andrzej Sapkowski (Sadly, the Hussite Triology is wasn't translated to English. It's available in German, Spanish and Russian, though) and Song of Fire and Ice.
To be honest, decent (not to mention good) fantasy seems to be pretty rare. Iliad looks pretty promising, though.

Do you know any historical novels that feature realistic ancient-renaissance combat?
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Re: Marketing the Codex

Postby zarlor » Thu Sep 16, 2010 1:05 pm

I can't say that it had anything relevant to HEMA in it, but I one of my favorite Fantasy novels has to be Dragonsbane by Barbara Hambly. G also wrote a review of "Wayward Apprentice" by Jay Vail (well known in the HEMA scene) http://www.amazon.com/Wayward-Apprentic ... 452876819/ over on Amazon (I'll let him repost it here if he feels it fits the bill). It's also available in Kindle format if you don't mind reading stuff electronically, which is how I have it right now based on his review, but I haven't read it yet.
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"A soldier uses arms merely with skill, whereas a knight uses them with virtuous intention." - Pomponio Torelli, 1596.

- Systeme D'armes, New Orleans, Louisiana
http://www.sdanola.com
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