Real AD&D stats test

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Real AD&D stats test

Postby Arkon » Thu Dec 02, 2010 12:03 pm

I have found something cool:
http://www.kevinhaw.com/add_quiz.php

My stats are:
STR:9
INT:13
WIS:11
DEX:8
CON:4
CHR:8


CON:4
Oh :( .
...
Arkon
 
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Galloglaich » Thu Dec 02, 2010 2:55 pm

That is quite clever :)

I think generally this little poll is skewed somewhat for older people like me.

Mine came out

Str 15
Int 13*
Wis 11
Dex 12
Con 9**
Ch 13

* I estimated my level of education since I work in a field where all of my colleagues had a degree, although I don't myself I didn't even graduate high-school

** I think my Con should actually be much lower than this, but I can drink a lot, have a high pain threshold and I don't have a glass jaw, so I think that artificially skewed it.

I've often been interested in this sort of thing since I first played DnD as a kid. Some of the stats seem to be contradictory in certain ways, like Con in the above example... I am pretty tough in terms of taking damage (I do HEMA fencing for fun every week which involves a lot of bruises), but I've got lousy stamina and i do get ill fairly often. It's almost like there are two different types.

Also strength, I'm a big guy so I can lift a lot, but pound for pound I'm not that strong compared to a lot of my more athletic friends.

Dexterity is another... I feel like I'm naturally clumsy but I have learned to do certain tricks pretty well, such as in fighting or fencing, throws, disarms, armlocks that sort of thing. I seem to have good coordination if I'm paying attention or doing something I've trained, but by default I think I'm pretty clumsy. I wonder how you could model this in an RPG or computer game....

I have this lifepath character generation system I made, and one of the premises in it is how age affects a character. I don't thnk you can have a teenager with an 18 wisdom, or even a 13 wisdom. I don't think your wisdom can go over half your age probably, except maybe in freakishly unusual cases like some kind of child Dalai Lama if such a thing actually exists. I know for sure my wisdom was half whatever it really is now when I was 16.

On the flip side, your constitution and dexterity steadily decline after you reach 25 or so, I don't thnk a 40 year old man can compete in track and field with an 18 year old kid, although there are some exceptions.

Finally, I think certain forms of intelligence, or more precisely knowledge, obviously increase dramatically as you get older. But other types of thinking deteriorate. Scientists tend to have all their breakthroughs in their 30's I think.

G.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Galloglaich » Fri Dec 03, 2010 4:42 am

So anyway I think more realistic stats for me would be:

Str 12
Int 13
Wis 7
Dex 8
Con 6
Ch 11

But! I give myself 2 levels of fighter and 1 of medic, And 1 of commoner :)

G.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Arkon » Sat Dec 04, 2010 11:17 am

STR is based on AD&D stats and is an objective strength, not on strength to weight ratio.
...
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Galloglaich » Sat Dec 04, 2010 4:18 pm

But see, that is where it gets tricky. This is why many RPG systems differentiate Strength and Stature (which introduces new complications, and usually the requirement for composite scores)

I have buddies in my fencing club who can bench press more than I can, and who could probably beat me in arm-wrestling (and for RPG example, bend bars or lift gates easier), but I can push them around on the fencing field and dominate them in grappling, because of my size.

So that can make it tricky to estimate in DnD terms.

G.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Daeruin » Sat Dec 04, 2010 4:42 pm

In my homebrew system, I created two "sub-attributes" for each standard one. They were related to each other, but one could be a certain degree higher than the other. So for example Constitution consisted of Health and Stamina, where health was your resistance to disease and stamina was your endurance. Strength consisted of Brawn (pure muscle strength) and Size. Will consisted of Backbone (conviction, faith, resistance to temptation, etc.) and Grit (ability to ignore pain and fatigue). I think those divisions helped model a lot of real world situations like you're describing. Often the two aspects are related, but they aren't always the same. Of course a system like that often starts to get more and more complex. I never actually used my homebrew, but it's fun to tinker around with now and then.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Daeruin » Sat Dec 04, 2010 9:34 pm

Also G, with regard to your Dex, I think that's just reflected in your skills. Your BAB is pretty high even though your Dex is low.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Galloglaich » Sun Dec 05, 2010 1:46 am

yeah you are probably right. I can do a lot of other things like skateboard or type very fast or drive with agility, but these could also all be just from skill points in a DnD sense rather than an attribute.

It's kind of an interesting idea imagine a fighter in DnD with lousy stats, you almost never see that. But there were probably many middle aged old veterans who were real dangerous men back in the day.

G.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Galloglaich » Sun Dec 05, 2010 1:49 am

Speaking of BaB, I think you also see a reflection of that in real life fencing. It relates to what we were talking about in the other thread. i think you often see an engagement go up to about 4 exchanges.. in the intense pressure of a tournament, less experienced fencers rarely seem to do more than make one strike (often without even thinking of blocking) per match; whereas more experienced guys will move, strike, defend, strike again, and move out of range. I think the Martial Pool thing really does feel right and I think the sweet spot is around 4, although conceivably it could go up at higher levels, I think MP of 4 reflects about the top level of HEMA fencing we see today but I'm certain that is going to go up at the current rate people are improving.

G.
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Re: Real AD&D stats test

Postby Ioannes » Sun Dec 05, 2010 7:42 am

Galloglaich wrote:yeah you are probably right. I can do a lot of other things like skateboard or type very fast or drive with agility, but these could also all be just from skill points in a DnD sense rather than an attribute.

It's kind of an interesting idea imagine a fighter in DnD with lousy stats, you almost never see that. But there were probably many middle aged old veterans who were real dangerous men back in the day.

G.


When the HEMA community gets the age and depth that the SCA community has (45 years of fighting), you'll have the same phenomenon we do -- grandfathers who tell newbies "I'm just a tired old man". . . And consistently end in the semi-finals or finals of major tournaments. Happens when you've been fighting for 30 years or more. We have guys who won their first tournaments in the 1970s who are still revered as legends, and still win bouts. Most of our fighters don't get taken truly seriously for their first decade.

Where it starts to catch up with folks is stamina -- there are people I can run into the ground. But if you're good enough, you win your fights quickly, while the newbies are fighting exchange after exchange.
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